Survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC): Evidence from the SEER database 2010-2011

Survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC): Evidence from the SEER database 2010-2011

2015 Journal of Clinical Oncology

Rebecca Alexandra Dent | Paul N. Mainwaring | Tira Jing Ying Tan | Sylvaine Barbier | Javier Cortes | Kimberly L. Blackwell | Shaheenah S. Dawood | Volume: 33, Issue: 15_suppl, Pages: e12075-e12075,

e12075 Background: Precision medicine has led to the definition of molecular phenotypes, such as TNBC.TNBC is characterized by a more aggressive biology and worst clinical outcome, stage for stage compared to other molecular phenotypes. Increasing use of second, third generation and drug specific combination chemotherapy regimens in TNBC as well as targeted therapies has emerged. We have interrogated the SEER database to look for survival outcomes in TNBC in light of these changes in patterns of care. Methods: Using the SEER database, we have looked at overall survival in over 10,000 women with TNBC according to stage. Tumors were coded as IHC ER, PR and HER2 negative. These women were diagnosed in 2010-2011 with subsequent follow up & should reflect current clinical practice (Sparano JCO 2015). Results: Demographics of these women: 20% Afro-Caribbean, 7% Asian and 72% Caucasian. 22% of women were born overseas. Pathology: G1-12%, G2 – 16%, G3 -77%; rest unknown. Stage at presentation; I 34%, II 42%, III 15% IV 6%, rest unknown. Surgery: 47% lumpectomy, 43% mastectomy, 9% no surgery. Overall survival by stage at 24 months; I 97%, II 93%, III 71%, IV 27%. Breast cancer specific survival by stage at 24 months: I 97%, II 95%, III 76%, IV 31%. See Graph 1. Conclusions: Our review demonstrated an overall survival of over 90% in early stage (I & II) TNBC at 2 years. Survival in more advanced stages remains short with medians of 12-14 months for MBC, which is in line with results from recent clinical trials (O’Shaughnessy JCO 2014, Tutt et al. SABCS 2014). The early separation of survival curves with advanced disease drives continued efforts to define subgroups for more precise therapeutic options.

https://www.doi.org/10.1200/jco.2015.33.15_suppl.e12075