Routine clinical assessment of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder

Routine clinical assessment of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder

2014 Eur. Neuropsychopharmacol

Belgaied, W. | Samp, J. | Vimont, A. | Remuzat, C. | Aballea, S. | El Hammi, E. | Kooli, A. | Toumi, M. | Akhras, K. | Volume: 24, Issue: 1, Pages: 133-141, Awareness, Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Depressive Disorder, Disease, Europe, France, mental health, methods, Schizophrenia, United States,

As more evidence points to the association of cognitive dysfunction with mental health disorders, the assessment of cognitive function in routine clinical care of these disorders is increasingly important. Despite this, it remains unknown how cognitive function is measured in routine clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess psychiatrists’ awareness of cognitive dysfunction in mental health disorders and their methods of cognitive assessment. An online survey was disseminated to psychiatrists in Europe, Asia, Australia and the United States. The survey asked about their perceptions of cognitive dysfunction in several mental health disorders, knowledge of cognitive assessment, method of cognitive assessment, and instruments used to measure cognitive function. Among the 61 respondents, most perceived that schizophrenia was associated with the greatest cognitive dysfunction. Many were unaware whether guidelines were available on cognitive assessment. In schizophrenia, 59% of psychiatrists reportedly used cognitive instruments, while the remainder relied solely on patient history interviews. The use of instruments to assess cognition in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) was lower, 38% and 37% respectively. Of the reported instruments used, only a few were actually appropriate for use in the diseases of interest (12% in schizophrenia, 3% in MDD and 0% in BPD). Other instruments reported were clinical measures that did not assess cognition. These findings reveal some inconsistencies in psychiatrists’ routine clinical evaluation of cognitive function. There appeared to be low use of true cognitive assessment instruments in clinical practice and confusion regarding what constituted a cognitive assessment instrument

https://www.doi.org/S0924-977X(13)00327-1 [pii];10.1016/j.euroneuro.2013.11.001