[PMH16] Relapse in Schizophrenia: costs and quality of life

[PMH16] Relapse in Schizophrenia: costs and quality of life

2000 Value in health

Brugha, T. | Almond, S. | Francois, C. | Toumi, M. | Volume: 3, Issue: 5, Pages: 349, Schizophrenia, Quality of Life,

OBJECTIVE: To compare the costs and quality of life of
77 patients who relapse with a control group of 68 nonrelapse
patients, in schizophrenia. METHODS: Patients
were selected from current (active) psychiatric caseloads
drawn from urban, suburban and rural Leicester and Leicestershire.
Relapse cases were identified by the re-emergence
and aggravation of symptoms, and by psychiatric
in-patient re-admissions, current or within the last 6 months.
Data collection included: social and demographic profiles,
DSM IV classification, PANSS, CGI, GAF, Quality
of Life (Lehman), EuroQol, and health care utilization.
Standard parametric/non-parametric tests are used to test
for differences in outcomes and costs for relapse and
non-relapsing patients. Hypothesis-driven analyses focus
on the correlates of quality of life, links between symptoms
and functioning, socio-economic consequences of
schizophrenia, and cost consequences of positive symptoms
and functioning deficits. Standard multivariate analysis
will identify key determinants of costs, and Generalized
Linear Models will be used to predict relapse status. Provisional
results confirm higher costs and lower quality of
life for patients who relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Schizophrenia
is a long-term, debilitating and costly illness. Potentially
high costs are incurred by health care providers,
social services and other care agencies, and by families
and sufferers themselves. One of the most costly aspects
of schizophrenia is associated with illness relapse, which
has been estimated, for example, to cost $2 billion in readmission
costs in the US. There is currently no equivalent
estimate for the UK. The findings from this study
will be of interest to policy-makers who face difficult economic
choices concerning new but more expensive drug
treatments for patients with schizophrenia. The challenge
for new antipyschotic treatments is to improve efficacy
and compliance and thereby reduce relapse rates. In turn
this would be expected to bring about reductions in the
total national costs of schizophrenia, whilst also improving
the welfare of patients.

https://www.doi.org/10.1016/S1098-3015(11)70754-9