[PHS147] Alcoholism In Italy: An Introductive Analysis of Consumption And Hospitalisation Trends

[PHS147] Alcoholism In Italy: An Introductive Analysis of Consumption And Hospitalisation Trends

2016 Value in Health

Aiello, A. | D'Ausilio, A. | Latorre, E. | Toumi, M. | Volume: 19, Issue: 7, Pages: A629-A630,

OBJECTIVES: Alcohol (beverage ethanol) distributes throughout the body, affecting almost all systems and altering nearly every neurochemical process in the brain. Alcohol is likely to exacerbate most medical conditions and affect almost any medication metabolized in the liver. The aim of this research is to analyse, between 2009-2014, alcohol consumption trends in Italy and the hospitalizations for acute alcoholic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and alcoholic fatty liver. We have also analysed the ratio between alcohol consumption and hospitalizations as well as hospital expenditures. METHODS: Data on alcohol consumption from the National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) and hospital discharge data from the Ministry of Health were matched to show hospitalisations trends in Italy. Last published National DRGs Tariffs (year 2012) were used to estimate the cost of hospitalizations, in order to show difference in healthcare expenditure in the selected period. RESULTS: Between 2009-2014, nearly 26.5 million daily alcohol consumers were observed. In the analysed period, the percentage of daily alcohol consumers (DACs) has decreased from 27.0% (14,419k) to 22.7% (12,020k), with a lower decrease in people at high-risk habits (HRACs) (i.e. binge drinkers or heavy drinkers as defined by ISTAT) from 15.8% (8,454k) to 15.2% (8,265k). Hospitalizations due to alcohol consumption showed a sharp decrease from 82,713 in 2009 to 59,124 in 2014. The estimated ratio in 2009-2014 for DACs hospitalizations decreased from 5.7‰ to 4.9‰ and for HRACs from 9.8‰ to 7.2‰ respectively. The total hospital costs related to liver diseases showed a decrease from €262,281,276 in 2009 to €193,907,144 in 2014. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis showed a slight decrease in alcohol consumption which may have translated in a deep decrease of hospitalizations for liver problems alcoholism-related. Other causes should be scrutinized to confirm such results.

https://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.jval.2016.09.1629