Memantine enhances autonomy in moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease

Memantine enhances autonomy in moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease

2004 Int J Geriatr Psychiatry

Rive, B. | Vercelletto, M. | Damier, F. D. | Cochran, J. | Francois, C. | Volume: 19, Issue: 5, Pages: 458-64, Activities of Daily Living, Aged, Alzheimer Disease/*drug therapy/rehabilitation, Double-Blind Method, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists/*therapeutic use, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Memantine/*therapeutic use, *Personal Autonomy,

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and its course renders patients functionally disabled. Memantine is the first drug to demonstrate a clinical benefit in the treatment of patients with moderately-severe to severe AD. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to illustrate the benefits of memantine on functional disability. METHODS: We classified 252 patients from a randomised 28-week clinical trial of memantine vs placebo according to their Activities of Daily Living capabilities measured by the ADCS-ADLsev scale. The scale was divided into two sub-scores: basic and instrumental. The relevance of this classification was validated by comparing clinical and socio-demographic parameters between the different autonomy classes (autonomous and dependent). The effect of memantine was estimated by using a logistic regression model on the autonomy status of patients at week 28, controlling for confounding factors (Observed Cases analysis). RESULTS: Our results showed that dependent patients (n = 106) had significantly longer disease duration, poorer cognition, greater severity, more behavioural alterations and higher total societal costs compared with autonomous patients (n = 146). When controlling for autonomy and severity at baseline, memantine-treated patients were three times more likely [Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.03; 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) = (1.38, 6.66)] to remain autonomous after 28 weeks. Analysis of the Treated Per Protocol set and the use of Last Observation Carried Forward analyses confirmed this finding. CONCLUSIONS: Memantine enhances autonomy in patients with moderately-severe to severe AD by increasing the probability of their remaining autonomous, therefore delaying transition to the dependent stage.

https://www.doi.org/10.1002/gps.1112