[HP3] Treatments patterns, resource use and related health care costs in depressed patients with co-morbid anxiety in a large US claims database

[HP3] Treatments patterns, resource use and related health care costs in depressed patients with co-morbid anxiety in a large US claims database

2008 Value in health

Guelfucci, F. | Francois, C. | Milea, D. | Saragoussi, D. | Toumi, M. | Volume: 11, Issue: 6, Pages: A360, Health Care Costs, Anxiety, Depression, database analysis,

OBJECTIVES: Anxiety is frequently associated with major
depressive disorder (MDD). Antidepressants are approved for
MDD and some anxiety disorders. However, few data exist on
real-life utilisation and outcomes of antidepressant treatments in
patients with MDD and co-morbid anxiety. This study aims
at describing and comparing treatment patterns, health care
resource use and associated costs in these patients. METHODS:
This cohort study using the US claims database PharMetrics
included adults with a first prescription of an antidepressant
(escitalopram, an SSRI or venlafaxine) associated with a diagnosis
of MDD in 2003-2005, and with two diagnoses of anxiety in
the year surrounding this first prescription. Treatment patterns,
health care resource use and related costs were assessed during
the 6-month before and after first prescription, and compared
across treatment groups. RESULTS: Of 18,676 patients, 69%
were women, and mean age was 40. 25% of patients were
prescribed escitalopram, 64% SSRIs, and 11% venlafaxine.
Treatment patterns showed a 15% switch rate, a 16% combination
rate and 23% of stops with no subsequent relapse (successful
treatment stop). Both switch and combination rates were
lower with escitalopram vs. SSRIs and venlafaxine (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002 respectively). Successful treatment stops were more frequent with escitalopram vs. venlafaxine (p < 0.001). 6-month total health care costs after treatment initiation were not significantly different than before (US$ 4,656 vs. US$4,254), but the structure of costs differed, with more pharmacy costs (20% vs. 10%), and less inpatient care (36% vs. 51%) after treatment start. Compared with baseline costs, health care costs were decreased with escitalopram and increased with SSRIs and venlafaxine (-US$74 vs. + US$496 and + US$916 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with MDD and co-morbid anxiety, antidepressant treatment was generally associated with decreased inpatient care. Compared with SSRIs and venlafaxine, escitalopram was associated with less treatment changes and with decreased costs.

https://www.doi.org/10.1016/S1098-3015(10)66238-9