Housing and house-dust mites

Housing and house-dust mites

1995 Allergy

Dornelas de Andrade, A. | Birnbaum, J. | Lanteaume, A. | Izard, J. L. | Corget, P. | Artillan, M. F. | Toumi, M. | Vervloet, D. | Charpin, D. | Volume: 50, Issue: 2, Pages: 142-6, Allergens/*analysis, Animals, Antigens, Dermatophagoides, Bedding and Linens, Cross-Sectional Studies, Glycoproteins/analysis, *Housing, Humans, Humidity, *Mites, Ventilation,

Because the mite-allergen content in homes is highly variable even in the same geographic area, we tried to determine which variables influence mite infestation. We evaluated mite-allergen content in bedding relative to housing conditions and living habits. This cross-sectional study included 108 homes. Housing conditions were assessed by an architect and living habits by a researcher specialized in social and family economics. Group I allergen level was measured on the mattress dust with monoclonal antibodies, and relative humidity (RH) was monitored in the bedroom during a 2-week period. Homes with low RH did have low mite-allergen content. In contrast, homes with intermediate RH levels had very variable mite-allergen content. Using analysis of variance and a logistic regression analysis, we were unable to identify any variable predictive of mite-allergen content. Thus, factors other than relative humidity seem to influence mite infestation. Moreover, the absence of association between mite infestation and ventilation rate might be accounted for by the gentle climate in our area with notable outdoor RH.