Design of patient access schemes in the UK: influence of health technology assessment by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

Design of patient access schemes in the UK: influence of health technology assessment by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

2011 Appl. Health Econ. Health Policy

Jaroslawski, S. | Toumi, M. | Volume: 9, Issue: 4, Pages: 209-215, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Drug Costs, Drug Industry, economics, France, Great Britain, Humans, market access agreements, methods, National Health Programs, Relative Value Scales, statistics & numerical data,

BACKGROUND: Patient Access Schemes (PAS) are alternative market access agreements between the UK Department of Health and drug manufacturers. They are implemented to enable the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to recommend expensive medicines for use in the UK NHS. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to analyse the extent to which NICE drug appraisals influence the construction of PAS and what rationale underlies the variety of approaches to their design. METHODS: We analysed publicly available documentation on PAS developed as a part of the NICE Health Technology Assessment process. RESULTS: We demonstrate how the design of PAS is determined by the kind of evidence that is available to model cost effectiveness of a drug and by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio that is deemed acceptable in a given patient population. PAS aimed to reduce drug cost to the NHS by means of various discounts or rebates on a per-patient basis rather than by lowering the list price of drugs. While almost all schemes were proposed by the industry in reply to negative draft recommendations by NICE, motivations of the stakeholders to implement PAS are not disclosed in the publicly available documentation. CONCLUSION: A more transparent process might be necessary to protect against a perverse impact of PAS on international reference pricing that uses list prices rather than the real cost of purchasing medicines that the NHS incurs

https://www.doi.org/1 [pii];10.2165/11592960-000000000-00000