Cost-effectiveness of memantine in moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease in Norway

Cost-effectiveness of memantine in moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease in Norway

2012 Int. J. Geriatr. Psychiatry

Rive, B. | Aarsland, D. | Grishchenko, M. | Cochran, J. | Lamure, M. | Toumi, M. | Volume: 27, Issue: 6, Pages: 573-582, Aged, Aged,80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, analysis, Cost Savings, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Disease Progression, drug therapy, economics, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Female, France, Humans, Male, Markov Chains, Memantine, methods, mortality, Norway, Quality of Life, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, therapeutic use, therapy,

BACKGROUND: The cost-effectiveness of memantine for the treatment of moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease has been assessed in several European countries. Objective of the study was to assess it in Norwegian settings. METHODS: This cost-utility analysis used a Markov modelling approach to simulate the evolution of patients until their need for full-time care (FTC) over a 5-year period. FTC was defined as a patient becoming either dependent or institutionalised. Transition probabilities were estimated using a newly developed predictive equation of time to FTC. Health resource use and utilities were obtained from the Scandinavian Study of Cost and Quality of Life in Alzheimer’s Disease study, and mortality was obtained from the Oslo study. Memantine efficacy was based on a meta-analysis of six large trials. The model compared memantine with its alternative in this population, that is no pharmacological treatment or background therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The model underwent extensive sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: In Norway, memantine was found to delay the need for FTC by 4.4 weeks compared with standard care and was associated with increased quality-adjusted life years. Memantine was the dominant strategy with cost savings of euro3739 (30 041 NOK) per patient. The probability of being the dominant strategy was 98.8%. This result was confirmed across multiple sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The model suggests that memantine prolongs time to FTC for no additional cost to the healthcare system and society. It can be regarded as a cost-effective choice in the management of moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease

https://www.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2755