[Burnout: A German Phenomenon?]

[Burnout: A German Phenomenon?]

2013 Psychiatr. Prax

Angermeyer, M.C. | Schomerus, G. | Carta, M.G. | Moro, M.F. | Toumi, M. | Millier, A. | Holzinger, A. | Volume: 40, Issue: 8, Pages: 425-429, Attitude, Depression, France, Germany, Italy, Mental Disorders, mental health,

Objective: To examine whether the term “burnout” is particularly popular in Germany.Methods: Results from four representative population surveys on public beliefs and attitudes about mental disorders, which have been conducted in Germany, Austria, France, and Italy between 2009 and 2012, are compared. In all surveys, respondents had been presented with a case-vignette depicting someone suffering from a moderate depressive episode. Following that, they were asked how they would call the condition described in the case-vignette.Results: While in Germany and Austria over 10 % of respondents labeled the depressive symptoms as “burnout”, in France only 2 % and in Italy not a single respondent used this “diagnosis”. In Germany, another 9.5 % employed the German equivalent to the English term “burned out” or expressions like “exhausted” or “overworked” whereas in the other countries hardly anybody used those words.Conclusion: Obviously the term “burnout” enjoys greater popularity in Germany and Austria than in France and Italy. Apart from linguistic and stigma-related aspects, this may be explained by differences in the perception of current work conditions in the various countries

https://www.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1343199