Adriamycin-related anxiety-like behavior, brain oxidative stress and myelotoxicity in male Wistar rats

Adriamycin-related anxiety-like behavior, brain oxidative stress and myelotoxicity in male Wistar rats

2011 Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav

Merzoug, S. | Toumi, M.L. | Boukhris, N. | Baudin, B. | Tahraoui, A. | Volume: 99, Issue: 4, Pages: 639-647, Algeria, Animals, Antibiotics,Antineoplastic, Anxiety, blood, Blood Cell Count, Bone Marrow, Brain, Brain Chemistry, Doxorubicin, drug effects, Glutathione, Glutathione Transferase, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, metabolism, Motor Activity, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Oxidative Stress, pharmacology, psychology, Quality of Life, Rats, Rats,Wistar, Weight Gain,

Chemotherapeutic regimens have been indicated to negatively impact the quality of life for patients. Adriamycin (ADR) is an effective chemotherapeutic agent widely employed for the treatment of human’s malignancies; however, it may cause serious side effects. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of acute administration of ADR on cognitive alterations, brain oxidative status and immune dysregulation in male Wistar rats. Treated animals received a single intraperitoneal injection of ADR (7 mg/kg). Control ones received physiological saline only. Behavioral effects were tested in the elevated plus-maze and the open field which showed that drug-treated rats displayed anxious behavior and deteriorations in the locomotive and exploratory activities over the 72 h following ADR injection as compared to controls. Assessment of brain antioxidant capacity in ADR-injected animals revealed an increase in glutathione-S-transferase activities and malondialdehyde levels while a decrease in glutathione concentrations when compared with the vehicle-treated group. Our results indicated that ADR administration decreased total leukocyte, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts, while enhanced monocyte levels. Moreover, white blood cells (WBC) relative counts in ADR-treated rats showed a significant increase in monocytes and granulocytes and a decrease in lymphocytes as compared to controls. This study suggests that ADR-related cognitive impairments are associated with brain oxidative stress and myelosuppression

https://www.doi.org/S0091-3057(11)00207-3 [pii];10.1016/j.pbb.2011.06.015